What is your hair type?

Standard
Its time to change your hair regimen due to the change of season. To determine the right regimen, you must know your hair type. Most people will classify their hair in three categories: coarse, straight, or curly; however there is more to determining your hair type. Actually, knowing your hair type will help in deciding the correct products to use on your hair to maintain or grow healthy hair.
When determining your hair type, please remember the following:
  • New growth is very important. At least 3-4 inches of virgin new growth is ideal.

  • Dry hair

  • If you relaxed your hair and it “reverted”, it has still been chemically processed and hence its texture has been altered

  • If you are transitioning from a relaxer to natural, make sure all the relaxed ends have been cut off..if not it will distort your view of the new growth & determining your hair type.

Use the below hair classification system to determine your hair type:


FIRST CLASSIFIER – Your curliness (or lack thereof)

The straight ones
1a – stick straight
1b – straight but with a slight body wave, just enough to add some volume, doesn’t look wavy
1c – straight with body wave and one or two visible S-waves (e.g. nape of neck or temples)

The wavy ones
2a – loose, stretched out S-waves throughout the hair
2b – shorter, more distinct S-waves (similar to waves from braiding damp hair)
2c – distinct S-waves and the odd spiral curl forming here and there

The curly ones
3a – big, loose spiral curls
3b – bouncy ringlets
3c – tight corkscrews

The really curly ones
4a – tightly coiled S-curls
4b – tightly coiled hair bending in sharp angles (Z-pattern)

SECOND CLASSIFIER – What (most of) your individual strands look like

F – Fine
Thin strands that sometimes are almost translucent when held up to the light. Shed strands can be hard to see even against a contrasting background. Similar to hair found on many people of Scandinavian descent.

You can also try rolling a strand between your thumb and index finger. Fine hair is difficult to feel or it feels like an ultra-fine strand of silk

M – Medium
Strands are neither fine nor coarse. Similar to hair found on many Caucasians.

You can also try rolling a strand between your thumb and index finger. Medium hair feels like a cotton thread. You can feel it, but it isn’t stiff or rough. It is neither fine or coarse.

C – Coarse
Thick strands that where shed strands usually are easily identified against most backgrounds. Similar to hair found on many people of Asian or native American descent.

You can also try rolling a strand between your thumb and index finger. Coarse hair feels hard and wiry. As you roll it back and forth, you may actually hear it.

THIRD CLASSIFIER – Your overall volume of hair

Put your hair in a ponytail with as much hair as possible in it. Don’t bother with the way it looks – the goal is to have most/all of your hair in there. If it means it sits smack dab on top of your head, put it there.

Measure the circumference of the ponytail. If you have bangs and/or you can’t get all of your hair in there adjust according to how much of your hair you have measured.

i – thin (less than 2 inches/5 centimeters)
ii – normal (between 2-4 inches or 5-10 centimeters)
iii – thick (more than 4 inches/10 centimeters)

Now what is your hair type?

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